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Thread: Winter Operations

  1. #1

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    Default Winter Operations

    What do you think about removing the spinner for winter operations in the hope that the reduced air flow over the cylinders will raise the operating temperatures to a satisfactory level?

  2. #2
    Glen Geller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    Just install the oil cooler cold weather cover (available from Univair) when it's below 40F, this is how Piper designed the thing.
    And use the recommended grade of oil for the outside temp.
    I always say to myself "Self, what will the insurance company say when things go FUBAR and the plane is in some non-standard condition?"
    Glen Geller
    1955 PA22-150 "One For Papa!"

  3. #3
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    I have put duct tape over the cowl inlets before. Cessna had kits for the 140 and 170 that accomplished this. I have always wondered how much more air gets in there because of the spinner.

  4. #4

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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    It would be a pretty easy experiment. You could tell the insurance guy, "It was there when I took off!"

  5. #5

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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    What data says a spinner is minimum equipment and cannot be removed?

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce
    I have put duct tape over the cowl inlets before. Cessna had kits for the 140 and 170 that accomplished this. I have always wondered how much more air gets in there because of the spinner.
    I've got a 140 with the kit, O200 with C150 spinner, and on a cold day the oil temp goes to 140. If OAT is 45-50 I can get 180. I thing the big spinner makes a lot of difference. With a C85 and skull cap, kit installed, temps are higher. Go figure.?!
    Bob N5656H N72672

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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    OK guys and gals , we are talking parts here and ive been looking at univair and cannopt find the oil cooler block off . So i need a part number for a lycosaurus 0-320 150hp on my PA 22/20 oil cooler winter cold weather cover thingy .

    Thanks
    3579erA
    Fly safe fly low fly slow

  8. #8

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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    Quote Originally Posted by eskflyer
    OK guys and gals , we are talking parts here and ive been looking at univair and cannopt find the oil cooler block off . So i need a part number for a lycosaurus 0-320 150hp on my PA 22/20 oil cooler winter cold weather cover thingy .

    Thanks
    3579erA
    How about I loan you one and you make your own? Larry Huntley

  9. #9
    Glen Geller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    Esk & Boon, sorry 'bout that, I thought I saw that Winterization Cover at Univair before, I guess not. I checked Andy's site and the parts CD and no joy there either. I know I have seen a drawing somewhere...
    Thanks Larry for supporting these guys.
    Maybe you (or someone) could take an image of the part, front and back sides, using a desktop scanner, and post those to the site as an attachment for full-sized patterns.
    Glen
    Glen Geller
    1955 PA22-150 "One For Papa!"

  10. #10

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    Default Re: Winter Operations

    Well, I can't help on where to FIND one, but this "winterization plate" (as I recall, that is what the Owner's Handbook called it) can be found in the Piper PA-22 Parts Catalog, which calls it out as: COVER-Oil Radiator. "135", "150" and "160". That would be Item 16 on Figure 54 "Oil Radiator Installation", in the Parts Catalog. They list it as p/n 14073-00 and it's effectivity was for s/ns 22-534 and up. Every airplane was SUPPOSED to have one with it when it was sold from the Factory (no matter what the climate was like where "you" lived) so while nobody ever seems to HAVE ONE, there ought to be several THOUSAND hiding "out there"! I HAD a few over the years, but they went with airplanes that I restored and I don't have even one, now.

    At least MAYBE the p/n will help you out at the Boneyards, for getting "what you want". ...and yeah, they ought to be REAL EASY to fabricate. They were just a flat rectangular plate with a couple bent-up "fingers" on the cooler side that clipped inside the edges of the nosebowl inlet opening (mostly to keep it from just falling out on the ground when you were stopped!), and a fancy decalcomania (or was it one of Piper's famous screen prints???) that told you to use it when OAT was below 40 Degrees F and warning you to use the correct weight engine oil for the temps expected. Wish I had just one lying around to supply you with a scanned copy! C'mon... SOMEBODY must have one they can help out with for 30 seconds of their time to scan it and record the dimensions!!! Or lay it down, front and back, with a foot-long ruler alongside it and take a couple pictures of it.

    Okay, ONE PROBLEM with them was they tended to "dick up" the paint at the edges of the opening because they were loose enough to "dance" just a tad in flight. A little cloth medical [bandage] tape around the lip took care of that.

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