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Thread: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

  1. #21
    JPerkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    Had to repair the fabric in this area on my bird. When talking to my IA, he recommended using 3", 2", and 1" tapes to help stiffen the fabric in this area. One of the problems I was having was the screws where pulling through the fabric. Maybe this with other modifications might actually keep this area in tact.
    Here I've got 2" and 1". Didn't have any 3" available. Will use the 3" when I recover the wings in the unforseen future.

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    Jason Perkins

  2. #22
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    Completed an annual on a Pacer yesterday where both left and right inspection plates at the flap bell cranks were shucking plates and breaking the plastic grommets. Made some of the aluminum angle plates like I pictured in the first post of this thread and really stiffened up that area. Should quit being an issue. Sorry I didn't take any pictures but it was 103 degrees and the owner and I got started at 7:15 and got him headed home at 6:30 after a complete annual inspection with some dependencies. I'll get some pictures next time he is here.

  3. #23
    ysifly2's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Completed an annual on a Pacer yesterday where both left and right inspection plates at the flap bell cranks were shucking plates and breaking the plastic grommets. Made some of the aluminum angle plates like I pictured in the first post of this thread and really stiffened up that area. Should quit being an issue. Sorry I didn't take any pictures but it was 103 degrees and the owner and I got started at 7:15 and got him headed home at 6:30 after a complete annual inspection with some dependencies. I'll get some pictures next time he is here.
    Did you bond in new grommets in addition to the aluminum angle plates? were / are the inspection plates circular and clip in style?

    I have rectangular plates there that use screws into the grommets. Actually, I currently have a same size rectangular backing plate with nut plates, and the screws go through what is left of the grommet and into the backing plate.

    I have started the fab of the angle plates you show, guess I am wondering if i should rebond some grommets and then also incorporate the nutplates for the attach of the rectangular covers to the angle plate.
    Thoughts?


    Bryan


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  4. #24
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    The plastic grommet was in good enough shape that I could slip the inspection plate clip over it without any problem. Could just as well glue the fabric to the aluminum angle with Stewert's glue or contact cement to achieve the same thing I think.

  5. #25
    Stephen's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    I use Steve's aluminium rectangular inspection rings. I glued them with Stewart's glue. Then I put a cover doiley over using thin fabric and Stewart's glue and thoroughly ironed them down. Then I cut the fabric inside the rectangle ring diagonally. I fold and glue the triangle flaps inside the wing, then ironed them down. This made a strong and very stiff inspection hole. If I were fixing an existing bad inspection ring. I would remove the old ring then trim out frayed fabric and glue a new fabric patch in place first. I've done this repair up through silver in a day and got the plane airworthy and on their way home.
    "You can only tie the record for flying low."

  6. #26
    59pacer's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    I've just been doing the wing root repair and needed a better way to spray vertically up. I modified my favourite spraygun with a 90 degree elbow, and it worked really well.image.jpg

  7. #27
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    My PA-22/20 as well has shed a couple inspection plates from the inboard of both wings due to the fabric drumming. I have seen Steve's fix and might have to do that. I came of with an idea of bonding some gym type foam rubber about 1/2 to 3/4" on the inside surface of fabric between the ribs and around the inspection holes to see if that could dampen out the fabric vibration. Has anybody every tried that or something similar?
    Both optimists and pessimists contribute to society. The optimist invents the aeroplane, the pessimist the parachute

  8. #28
    59pacer's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    I've done Steve's modification, and still had problems, so I tried some foam strips between the fuel tank and fabric which seems to have deadened the vibration completely.
    When I get back home in a week I'll be able to post the details and photos of what I did.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    That would be great 59pacer. It would be nice to see some pictures of how you did it.
    Both optimists and pessimists contribute to society. The optimist invents the aeroplane, the pessimist the parachute

  10. #30
    59pacer's Avatar
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    Default Re: That Pesky Fabric Drumming Wing Root.

    Sorry. I can't access the photos I had taken, so it's word picture time. The butt rib is rib #1. Everything is the left wing.
    I removed the doily patches, inspection rings and the dope down to bare fabric from the trailing edge to about 9" forward to allow for a single rectangular patch that overlapped from inboard rib 2 to out board of rib 3. I installed new rings and the rectangular patch IAW the Ceconite Procedures Manual, then built up the dope finish. Lots of masking required and using my modified spray gun (post #25 above). There were cracks appearing in the dope beside rib 2 and 3, so I used an airbrush and butyrate rejuvenator to fill them. For the final coat of color I masked off out to rib 4 and as far forward as the metal leading edge. If my wife ever asks for another metallic silver dope (M9514) job, I'll trade her in for a new model. With a bit of polishing the repair and fresh dope wasn't obvious.
    I've used foam from my local supplier for many similar jobs in aircraft. I don't know what would be equivalent in the USA, but it is yellow, medium density, and is not affected by fuel and thinners.
    I cut a strip about 2" wide, length about the distance between front and rear spars, and stuck it with contact cement to a long strip of 2" wide Ceconite tape. When the glue had hardened, I put the foam through the bandsaw and tapered the foam from 1" to 1.5" thick.
    With the tank cover off, I was able to feed some strong string down the front of the tank, under it, and out at the rear of the tank, midway between ribs 2 and 3. Tying the string to the ceconite tape and foam, I was able to pull the string at the rear while feeding the foam strip in at the front, thin end (1") first. When I got it through enough to my satisfaction , I trimmed all the loose ends, and repeated the exercise between ribs 3 and 4.
    Only with the light in the right direction under the wing, is it possible to detect any presence of the foam against the fabric under the tank--almost unnoticeable.
    No drumming of fabric in flight!
    We're not long back from about 25 hours flying in the bush, and there is no evidence of any cracking, but only time will tell.

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