Welcome! Becoming a registered user of ShortWingPipers.Org is free and easy! Click the "Register" link found in the upper right hand corner of this screen. It's easy and you can then join the fun posting and learning about Short Wing Pipers!

Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Engine Break In

  1. #11
    Lownslow's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria, Texas
    Posts
    757
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hey Doug, No problem on the "run-in". I was just trying to find out whether anyone had positive experience using any of the "pre-oilers". I think it is a well known fact that engines suffer during starting, especially in cold weather, and then from lack of consistent operation. It also seems that the bigger engines (6 cyl) suffer more tha the 4's when not flown on a regular basis, as it seems that the cranks and cams have a lot more wear @ overhaul than the 4's. I have been recently tryng to find parts for a 540, and discovered that the 540 cranks and cams get a lot of wear. Good used parts are very hard to find without giving up an arm and hind leg for them. Just trying to see if others think it's worth the $1600 for a pre-oil system. It also appears some of the warbird stuff utilize the pre-oilers as they claim to fit this application. In short, I'm trying to determine whether to recommend a pre-oiler to a Comanche owner that flies only 60-80 hrs per year.

    Thanks,

    Lou

  2. #12
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default New cylinder brake in

    I have only 1,100 hours on brand new ECI cylinders and had problems with them for the last nine month. Nine month ago I had low compression on number 3 and 4 cylinder and had the valve seats redone. Now I had an oil leak on the pushrods tube on #4 and while the mechanic removed the rocker arm he noticed the rocker shaft bushing was loose. Turns out the hole for the bushing is already over sized (remember, they were brand new when installed) and makes the cylinder unusable. I am done with ECI cylindersand rather than flying with three 1,100 hour ECI cylinders and one new Lycoming, I had all four cylinders replaced (Outch!).

    Now, what is the best practice to brake them in. My mechanic recommends to fly the first five hours at mixture full rich and about 2,500 RPM, then normal operation. Any advise.

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z

  3. #13
    Old3pacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: New cylinder brake in

    Your mechanic sounds correct to me.
    Advice given to me was "run it like you stole it"
    meaning: avoid long low rpm periods, keep rpm up in the 65-75% range, avoid high density altitude and for now high altitude, use full rich. Additionally I would suggest: mineral oil based oil [no slippery lubricant additives] Probably, I would fly this way for 50 hrs and watch oil consumption.

    If others suggest differently, take their advice, I don't know much

  4. #14
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Graham, Texas, United States
    Posts
    10,859
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Engine Break In

    Juergen, I merged your thread with another on the subject including a link to a good document from Lycoming with some relative information. My normal break in operation is a very short run on the ground to check for leaks. I usually like to let it cool completely, usually overnight. Short taxi to the runway and take off. I stay just above pattern altitude very in power periodically but running it hard with rich mixture. You want high manifold pressure to seat the rings. The new cylinders seem to break in very quickly because of the new processes in boring cylinders, they are way more precisely bored round.

  5. #15
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Engine Break In

    Thanks Steve, I will read the Lycoming information before I fly it on Friday. I will do a flight around the airport and then the mechanic will check for leaks. On Saturday I need to fly the Pacer to an avionics shop about 60 NM South of Winchester. I purchased a (new to me) Garmin 430W and will have it installed next week (upgrade from my current IFR approved GPS) plus a software upgrade on my Aspen PFD. I hope after this is all done I'm good for a couple of years again.

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z

  6. #16
    mmoyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Platinum Alaska
    Posts
    1,904
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Engine Break In

    Quote Originally Posted by Lownslow View Post
    Hey Doug, No problem on the "run-in". I was just trying to find out whether anyone had positive experience using any of the "pre-oilers". I think it is a well known fact that engines suffer during starting, especially in cold weather, and then from lack of consistent operation. It also seems that the bigger engines (6 cyl) suffer more tha the 4's when not flown on a regular basis, as it seems that the cranks and cams have a lot more wear @ overhaul than the 4's. I have been recently tryng to find parts for a 540, and discovered that the 540 cranks and cams get a lot of wear. Good used parts are very hard to find without giving up an arm and hind leg for them. Just trying to see if others think it's worth the $1600 for a pre-oil system. It also appears some of the warbird stuff utilize the pre-oilers as they claim to fit this application. In short, I'm trying to determine whether to recommend a pre-oiler to a Comanche owner that flies only 60-80 hrs per year.

    Thanks,

    Lou
    Might consider a P.I.G. Least that’s what we called. Built using a new air reservoir for a class 8 truck. Welded in a few NPT fittings for a large ball valve to fill the tank with oil. The second NPT fitting was for a pressure gauge, ball valve and air chuck fitting. Then a tube welded in to the top of the tank, 1/4” off the bottom and another ball valve...from there airequip line. Connect the line to the main oil galley.. fill 75% with oil...pressurize to 100 psi...open the ball valve...shut the valve before the running the tank dry of oil...
    New preoilers can be had at summit racing...looks like they’re made using 25# propane tanks...cost is north of $300.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  7. #17
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Graham, Texas, United States
    Posts
    10,859
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Engine Break In

    I don't think pre-oiling after cylinder change is an issue. I have always been able to remove the top plugs and spin the starter and get oil pressure. Had to prime the oil pump on small Continentals by installing a fitting in an oil bottle connected to the oil pressure line and allowed to drain into the pump for a while.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •