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Thread: Trim crank bushing/bearing

  1. #1
    Kurts's Avatar
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    Default Trim crank bushing/bearing

    The trim crank assembly obviously rotates in a bushing or bearing and I'm wondering what is entailed in replacing it. Mine makes a slight grinding noise and while shooting it with LPS3 through the zipper in the headliner smooths it out and quiets it down, I'm thinking it may be getting time to look into why it's making that sound/feel to begin with.

    Any insight?

    Thanks, as always.

    Kurt
    63' Colt

  2. #2
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Kurt, it is actually just two steel tabs with holes in the tabs for the crank pin. These are bad about wearing and I have seen them bushed but it will require a hole in the top of your fabric above the handle. Brian Pankonin has posted some pictures of this I believe. LPS3 is the anti-corrosion formula. LPS1 or 2 would probably work better but try to keep it off the pulley and cable.

  3. #3
    Stephen's Avatar
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    If after lubricating with LPS2 and you are not satisfied. You might try cleaning up your jack screw and lubricating that prior to taking the trim crank apart. A clean lubricated jack screw does wonders to the ease of the trim system.
    "You can only tie the record for flying low."

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
    If after lubricating with LPS2 and you are not satisfied. You might try cleaning up your jack screw and lubricating that prior to taking the trim crank apart. A clean lubricated jack screw does wonders to the ease of the trim system.
    About every 2 or 3 years' I will take a length of cord about 1/8" thick or more and get it wrapped around the thread of the jackscrew, then get someone to run the trim up and down thru full travel as I move the cord to clean the grooves of old grease (and dirt). Once cleaned out I put some of that white lithium grease on a finger or toung depresser and get it on the jack screw above and below and run the trim up and down a couple times to get it distributed well. The white lithium is good for winter temps because it wont get thick and stiff like most other greases.



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  5. #5
    Kurts's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. We clean and lube the jackscrew every annual, and shoot grease in the fwd stab tube zerk as well. What I didn't know about was the hole in the rear tube that needs oil. Thanks to a recent thread on here however, now I do.

    It's not that the trim is hard to move, the crank mechanism is just noisy and doesn't feel smooth, you definitely hear and feel it grinding a bit. With the LPS3 it there it improved a lot though. I assume it's normal for the trim to be easy to crank on the ground but get heavier the faster the airspeed due to aerodynamic load on the stab.

    Kurt
    Last edited by Kurts; 06-30-2011 at 10:05 AM.
    63' Colt

  6. #6
    smcnutt's Avatar
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    I had an issue where the trim was making a grinding noise at the handle and then eventually locked up. It turned out that the roll pin that goes thru the pulley above the handle was coming out. As it was working out it was grinding against the bracket and when it worked out far enough it hit against the side and locked up.

    Might not be the case here but just an FYI.
    “Common sense is in spite of, not the result of, education.”
    ― Victor Hugo

  7. #7

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    Figured I would post my bushing fix on the front trim pulley I did a couple of years ago...

    First I oversize drilled the shaft holes...


    Then I made these two brass bushings on the lathe...


    The bushings are put in from the inside so that they cant "fall" out.... The wide end replaces the original shim washers...


    This picture really shows the bushing installation... I made a new shaft that was longer to take up the length of the bushings....


    Hope these help if you go this route....
    Brian

  8. #8
    deandayton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Trim crank bushing/bearing

    Quote Originally Posted by stevesaircraft(Bri) View Post
    Figured I would post my bushing fix on the front trim pulley I did a couple of years ago...

    First I oversize drilled the shaft holes...


    Then I made these two brass bushings on the lathe...


    The bushings are put in from the inside so that they cant "fall" out.... The wide end replaces the original shim washers...


    This picture really shows the bushing installation... I made a new shaft that was longer to take up the length of the bushings....


    Hope these help if you go this route....
    Brian
    Brian,
    I don't see any picture attached, maybe it got deleted during a web upgrade. Any chance your could repost it?

    My IA is working on a friends PA22 and it sounds like he is running into this issue. He seems to think that a field approval or STC would be required to install bushings. Do you have a 337 for this repair?

    Thanks
    Dean

  9. #9
    rocket's Avatar
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    Default Re: Trim crank bushing/bearing

    I had the hogged out holes and worn pin a number of years ago.

    I was able to bolt a piece of .080 steel strap top and bottom of the tabs with spacers between them. Three 3/16 bolts if I recall. The two repair tabs were match drilled before installation including the new 3/8 (?) pin hole. I fabricated a new pin from a 3/8 bolt fit it all together and drilled the handle pin hole with the handle in place.

    While I was at it I made a lexan cover so I can see the works.


    There is another trim thread with a foto or two of the compleat assembly. Not sure I ever took a photo of the works as I was building it up.


    Hardest part of the whole installation was cutting the headliner


    Really just a minor repair and I would say the same about the bushings if one went that route.


    Rocket.

  10. #10

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    Default Re: Trim crank bushing/bearing

    Quote Originally Posted by deandayton View Post
    Brian,
    I don't see any picture attached, maybe it got deleted during a web upgrade. Any chance your could repost it?

    My IA is working on a friends PA22 and it sounds like he is running into this issue. He seems to think that a field approval or STC would be required to install bushings. Do you have a 337 for this repair?

    Thanks
    Dean
    I think there are a few buried in Andy's restoration thread... If not, I will have to do a search for them...

    I consider it a minor change.

    Brian.

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