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Thread: Wheel Landings

  1. #1
    richas's Avatar
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    Default Wheel Landings

    I posted this on the "other" forum but I know there are some that do not go there.
    ************************************************** ************

    I received my TW endorsement in the Pacer. I was taught to do wheel landings by:


    Adjust sink rate with power ONLY, there should be no movement of the elevator.
    When the mains touch immediately and simultaneously chop the throttle and push the yoke FULL forward.
    keep it straight, stay off the brakes
    keep it straight, stay off the brakes
    keep it straight, stay off the brakes
    keep it straight, stay off the brakes
    When the tail starts to sag bring it quickly down, keep it straight
    brakes as necessary


    Anyone else learn this way?


    I told this to my buddy who flys an RV-8 and he was surprised that the yoke went full forward. I explained that that is what I was taught and that you cannot make the nose go too low, he was still doubtful.
    He tried to do it in his Rv but couldn't make himself do it!


    Rich

  2. #2
    smcnutt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wheelies

    I've never done a wheel landing. However, that's about the process I've heard from others. I can understand your buddy's concern with pushing the yolk full forward as I can't wrap my head around it either. Seems to be a sure fire way to nose over in my head. Again, never done a wheel landing or even seen it done.

    Seems opposite of what I was always taught that the yolk should be in your gut when you land.
    Last edited by smcnutt; 01-15-2013 at 03:18 PM.
    “Common sense is in spite of, not the result of, education.”
    ― Victor Hugo

  3. #3
    Zac Weidner's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wheelies

    I usually just touch town on the mains with a nice smooth flare then release back pressure on the yoke to get the third wheel on the ground.

  4. #4
    taildraggerpilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wheelies

    The reason for pushing the yoke forward is because the airplane is still flying when touching on the mains. If forward yoke is not applied, the C.G. being aft of the wheels, will cause the tail to drop and the airplane will bounce back into the air. Forward yoke reduces the wing's angle of attack allowing the main gear to remain in contact with the runway.
    I typically do wheel landings with power off and my landings are always slightly tail low for smooth contact and then forward yoke is applied at touchdown. More often than not, I begin applying brakes with the tail up as well. I don't get crazy with it, but it works well and I don't use up as much runway. The trick to power-off wheel landings is to keep the speed up, which is what is happening when approaching with power. The only difference is your sink rate and sight picture.

  5. #5

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    Default Re: Wheelies

    When I wheel land it's usually tail low at a higher speed work yoke forward to keep tail flying until tail settles then yoke back to plant the tail wheel

  6. #6
    Jim's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wheelies

    Hi,

    ....The reason for pushing the yoke forward is because the airplane is still flying....

    Keeping the tail up also aids in its authority while it's running in cleaner air. The tail will also be heavier after you can't hold it up any longer which allows better tail wheel contact when it does drop.
    EAA Technical Counselor #4562
    Experimental Aircraft Association #140897 (1977)

  7. #7
    Stephen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wheelies

    It is always interesting reading about other pilots landing techniques. I like taildraggers explanation, who would argue with an engineer. I generally use power to control sink rate or if I want to get in short, flying behind the power curve, nose high and slow. I also usually release the back pressure and let the tail come up for control as stated but, also for better braking. Brakes? What No brakes? Hey, check out that SC guy on video at Valdez using his brakes landing...that was a short landing.
    "You can only tie the record for flying low."

  8. #8
    Rollie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wheelies

    Thats about how I was taught to wheel land, fly a shallow approach with power at a level attitude and just fly it in, throttle to idle and yoke forward at touchdown. That had me touching down at 85-90 mph. I didn't like it. It might be good for crosswind landings but I mostly want to do wheel landings for off airport landings so mine are really a modified 3-point/wheel landing. Some planes can slow down without being as nose high as ours, but to land slow and keep the tail up in a Pacer the best I've been able to figure out is to make a 3-point landing and as soon as you are firmly on the ground, add forward yoke to bring the tail up, giving you better rudder authority and keeping the tail wheel from getting too beat up.

  9. #9

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    Default Re: Wheelies

    You can wheel land a Pacer at any speed from just above stalling to cruise and that is the beauty of the thing.
    The key is to have the proper visual image and understand the dynamics involved.
    I think of rolling the airplane up on the wheels and pressing them down into the runway.
    With the tail low (depends on the speed) you approach the ground with the thought that as the wheels touch you roll up onto them and carry forward pressure to keep it there.
    It helps if the airplane is trimmed faster that touchdown speed so that the airplane naturally wants to go nose down (for me).
    If you are timid and timing off then the bounce (from the angle of attack changing when the wheels touch and the GC behind pulling the tail down.
    To prevent this you should plan to place the airplane in the proper place and the plant it as described above. This is where you need the practice, practice practice.
    If you practice and become comfortable then this would be the preferred method of landing as the control is better and the placement of the aircraftcan be more precise and if brakes are used the additional weight on the tires will shorten the landing run.
    Many disagree!

    JDB.

  10. #10
    richas's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wheelies

    What do you mean when you say "roll up onto the wheels"?

    Thanks

    Rich

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