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Thread: Want to learn cloth repair

  1. #1
    sierrasplitter's Avatar
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    Default Want to learn cloth repair

    I will have to do a repair on a interior tear due to a leaky fuel line. Fabric will be cut around 8 inches. Just enough to get the line out but will have to be patched
    I’m looking for a good how to video and I’m a bit surprised we don’t have a video on this
    that would be very useful
    im good at video edit but have never patched cloth so maybe if it goes well we will have a video

    I have read up on it. I’m leaning towards Stewart Systems for products
    i know I need an iron , glue , solvent for removing old paint , ceconite tape , maybe filler ? I have glue and filler.
    should be an exercise of my abilities
    luckily it’s not very exposed
    but I have to start somewhere

    this seems to be the best video for what I need to do
    Last edited by sierrasplitter; 01-01-2020 at 10:51 AM.

  2. #2
    JPerkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    Polyfiber has a YouTube channel with a lot of how to's. Best bet is to get your hands on the manual of whatever process you use and have an a&p walk you through it. They will need to sign it off for you anyways.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using ShortWingPipers.Org mobile app

  3. #3
    smcnutt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    Don't know but here's a video from Stewart Systems on inspection and repair. I think the repair starts at about 28 minutes. https://youtu.be/EIt52zP27TA


    Sent from my SM-T350 using ShortWingPipers.Org mobile app
    “Seek advice but use your own common sense.”
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  4. #4

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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    A&P sign off on an INTERIOR fabric repair? I don't think that would affect airworthiness. Duct tape, if you could put up with the look of it, would do.
    Interior fabric repair would be a very good place to learn new skills. Won't affect airworthiness if it's not perfect.

  5. #5

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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    Heck you can sign off exterior repairs as an owner. I have my logbook to prove it.

    Sent from my moto g(7) using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    JPerkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    Missed where he said interior. Yeah go crazy nuts, it'll be a great learning experience.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using ShortWingPipers.Org mobile app

  7. #7
    J Ryd's Avatar
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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    My understanding is a pilot/owner can do an external repair without a sign-off, as long as it's not a control surface. Polyfiber manual is pretty easy and straight forward as I'm sure others are too.

  8. #8
    rocket's Avatar
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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    Oy, all fabric repairs require a logbook entry. All repairs of any kind require a logbook entry.
    Part 43 has a list of preventive maintenance that registered owners with a pilots license are allowed to perform after being properly trained.


    I believe it as long is it doesn't require rib stitching and control balancing and does not fall under "replacement" per a major repair. Something like two rib bays wide...



    As far as the system used go ahead and use one of those solvent based ones inside the cockpit. That is if you want to kill brain cells.


    Sew up tears with the baseball stitch per AC43.13 and tape accordingly using Stewert systems glue and seal and weave fill per their instructions. Top coat as required.


    I always tell the more handy pilots to keep a copy of ac43.13 on the back of the toilet, read the good parts and study the drawings and diagrams. After a few years of pursuing its pages it works as a good sleep inducer, the best is the Stewert Systems videos though, cure any insomniac!


    If it sounds like I'm turning into one of those old grumpy pilot mechanics it's cause my bird is still down...


    Rocket

  9. #9
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    You might try wiping the finish with MEK on a rag. Might not be any catalyzed polyurethane on the interior and if so the finish will wipe off down to the raw fabric. I would get the manual for the system you intend to use and the Polyfiber manual. The Polyfiber manual is a good general fabric manual in my opinion.

  10. #10
    Gilbert Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Want to learn cloth repair

    Owner/pilot can make some fabric repairs. See item #7

    FAR 43 Appendix A(c): Preventive maintenance. Preventive maintenance is limited to the following work, provided it does not involve complex assembly operations:
    (1) Removal, installation, and repair of landing gear tires.
    (2) Replacing elastic shock absorber cords on landing gear.
    (3) Servicing landing gear shock struts by adding oil, air, or both.
    (4) Servicing landing gear wheel bearings, such as cleaning and greasing.
    (5) Replacing defective safety wiring or cotter keys.
    (6) Lubrication not requiring disassembly other than removal of nonstructural items such as cover plates, cowlings, and fairings.
    (7) Making simple fabric patches not requiring rib stitching or the removal of structural parts or control surfaces. In the case of balloons, the making of small fabric repairs to envelopes (as defined in, and in accordance with, the balloon manufacturers' instructions) not requiring load tape repair or replacement.
    (8 Replenishing hydraulic fluid in the hydraulic reservoir.
    (9) Refinishing decorative coating of fuselage, balloon baskets, wings tail group surfaces (excluding balanced control surfaces), fairings, cowlings, landing gear, cabin, or cockpit interior when removal or disassembly of any primary structure or operating system is not required.
    (10) Applying preservative or protective material to components where no disassembly of any primary structure or operating system is involved and where such coating is not prohibited or is not contrary to good practices.
    (11) Repairing upholstery and decorative furnishings of the cabin, cockpit, or balloon basket interior when the repairing does not require disassembly of any primary structure or operating system or interfere with an operating system or affect the primary structure of the aircraft.
    (12) Making small simple repairs to fairings, nonstructural cover plates, cowlings, and small patches and reinforcements not changing the contour so as to interfere with proper air flow.
    (13) Replacing side windows where that work does not interfere with the structure or any operating system such as controls, electrical equipment, etc.
    (14) Replacing safety belts.
    (15) Replacing seats or seat parts with replacement parts approved for the aircraft, not involving disassembly of any primary structure or operating system.
    (16) Trouble shooting and repairing broken circuits in landing light wiring circuits.
    (17) Replacing bulbs, reflectors, and lenses of position and landing lights.
    (18 Replacing wheels and skis where no weight and balance computation is involved.
    (19) Replacing any cowling not requiring removal of the propeller or disconnection of flight controls.
    (20) Replacing or cleaning spark plugs and setting of spark plug gap clearance.
    (21) Replacing any hose connection except hydraulic connections.
    (22) Replacing prefabricated fuel lines.
    (23) Cleaning or replacing fuel and oil strainers or filter elements.
    (24) Replacing and servicing batteries.
    (25) Cleaning of balloon burner pilot and main nozzles in accordance with the balloon manufacturer's instructions.
    (26) Replacement or adjustment of nonstructural standard fasteners incidental to operations.
    (27) The interchange of balloon baskets and burners on envelopes when the basket or burner is designated as interchangeable in the balloon type certificate data and the baskets and burners are specifically designed for quick removal and installation.
    (28 The installations of anti-misfueling devices to reduce the diameter of fuel tank filler openings provided the specific device has been made a part of the aircraft type certificiate data by the aircraft manufacturer, the aircraft manufacturer has provided FAA-approved instructions for installation of the specific device, and installation does not involve the disassembly of the existing tank filler opening.
    (29) Removing, checking, and replacing magnetic chip detectors.
    (30) The inspection and maintenance tasks prescribed and specifically identified as preventive maintenance in a primary category aircraft type certificate or supplemental type certificate holder's approved special inspection and preventive maintenance program when accomplished on a primary category aircraft provided:
    (i) They are performed by the holder of at least a private pilot certificate issued under part 61 who is the registered owner (including co-owners) of the affected aircraft and who holds a certificate of competency for the affected aircraft (1) issued by a school approved under §147.21(e) of this chapter; (2) issued by the holder of the production certificate for that primary category aircraft that has a special training program approved under §21.24 of this subchapter; or (3) issued by another entity that has a course approved by the Administrator; and
    (ii) The inspections and maintenance tasks are performed in accordance with instructions contained by the special inspection and preventive maintenance program approved as part of the aircraft's type design or supplemental type design.
    (31) Removing and replacing self-contained, front instrument panel-mounted navigation and communication devices that employ tray-mounted connectors that connect the unit when the unit is installed into the instrument panel, (excluding automatic flight control systems, transponders, and microwave frequency distance measuring equipment (DME)). The approved unit must be designed to be readily and repeatedly removed and replaced, and pertinent instructions must be provided. Prior to the unit's intended use, an operational check must be performed in accordance with the applicable sections of part 91 of this chapter.
    (32) Updating self-contained, front instrument panel-mounted Air Traffic Control (ATC) navigational software data bases (excluding those of automatic flight control systems, transponders, and microwave frequency distance measuring equipment (DME)) provided no disassembly of the unit is required and pertinent instructions are provided. Prior to the unit's intended use, an operational check must be performed in accordance with applicable sections of part 91 of this chapter.

    Approval to service and logbook entry after preventive maintenance performed by Pilot/Owner:
    The owner/pilot must enter in the aircraft logbook the following information(FAR 43.9(a):
    (1) A description (or reference to data acceptable to the Administrator) of work performed.
    (2) The date of completion of the work performed.
    (3) The name of the person performing the work if other than the person specified in paragraph (4).
    (4) If the work performed on the aircraft, airframe, aircraft engine, propeller, appliance, or component part has been performed satisfactorily, the signature, certificate number, and kind of certificate held by the person approving the work. The signature constitutes the approval for return to service only for the work performed.
    ______________________________
    Last edited by Gilbert Pierce; 01-02-2020 at 09:49 AM.

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