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Thread: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

  1. #1
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
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    Default Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    I am done fixing, repairing and making new parts for the cowling of my Pacer, it is time to paint to get ready for S&F. I have searched and read through quite a bit of the subject of using a HVLP turbine paint system with Stewart paint. I read through a lot of the concerns. The ones mentioned the most are:

    1) The air from the turbine getting too hot and some people recommending the use of a bucket with ice water to run the hose through, which then created comments about condensation building inside of the hose.
    2) The turbine (I have a 3 stage AXIS SP2003 with a 1 mm nozzle and a pressurized paint cup) not creating enough pressure to atomize the paint.

    When I purchased the paint I talked to the owner of Stewart System at S&F about using a turbine, but he of course said they have no experience and don't recommend it. I understand that he doesn't want to recommend anything they haven't tested.

    Is there anyone out there who has done it successfully? If you are out there, can you let me know about your experience and how you pulled it off?

    I haven't used my turbine paint system since about 2002 when I painted the tail feathers for the Pacer using Poly Tone paint. I have also used it with automotive paint fixing things my wife did to our cars. It always worked very well.

    Your advise on your actual experience would be greatly appreciated,

    Juergen
    Pace rN3342Z

  2. #2
    Gilbert Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    I used a turbine paint system to shoot Stewart’s paint. An extra length of hose provided adequate cooling, I used I believe a 0.7 tip and thinned the paint to 19 to 21 seconds on #2 Zahn cup. Take a bucket of water into the paint booth with you in case you like results wash it off immediately.
    Follow their instructions; many passes and slowly build up the paint until it flows out and glosses.
    If you make a wet passes like you do with solvent your based polyurethane it will fisheye, run, orange peel and look awful.

  3. #3
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    Thanks Gilbert, I like the idea of the bucket of water to wash off the paint if I don't like it. I believe the recommended viscosity is 22 to 24 seconds, so you thinned it down a little more. I will give it a try. The outside air temperature is still in the 50s here in Virginia. The hose on the turbine is long enough to leave the turbine outside the shop to suck in cooler air. Maybe that will also help some. The hose I'm using is also pretty long, I hope it's long enough to cool the air some more.

    I should get this all done before S&F, hope to see you and Steve there.

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z

  4. #4
    Gilbert Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    I would follow their recommendations, 22 to 24 seconds on the #2 Zahn cup.
    If it doesn’t workout, try a little thinner.
    Last edited by Gilbert Pierce; 03-05-2020 at 08:33 PM.

  5. #5
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    I went to my friends shop last night and set up all the parts for painting. I checked the hose and it's about 20 feet long. The paint booth (a party tent set up inside of his shop is close enough to the door to the outside. I will probably leave the turbine outside so it can suck in cold air.

    I haven't painted using my HVLP turbine system in about 17 years and have never used water based paint. All my flying buddies are skeptical when I tell them I can have a drink of my paint thinner when I get thirsty.

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    Quote Originally Posted by Pacer42Z View Post
    I went to my friends shop last night and set up all the parts for painting. I checked the hose and it's about 20 feet long. The paint booth (a party tent set up inside of his shop is close enough to the door to the outside. I will probably leave the turbine outside so it can suck in cold air.

    I haven't painted using my HVLP turbine system in about 17 years and have never used water based paint. All my flying buddies are skeptical when I tell them I can have a drink of my paint thinner when I get thirsty.

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z

    Hopefully you made a little test panel to practice on?

  7. #7
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    Yes I did make a test panel to practice on. My first big surprise was when I opened the can of the two part primer. The inside was in chunks of paint. I thought the primer had gone bad on me since it has been about 10 month since I purchased it. However, I read through the instructions provided by Stewart and it mentioned that the "Part A of the primer may gel", no kidding. It said to "just stir it until it becomes a thick fluid and don't add water". Well, I did add some distilled water to get it to the thick fluid stage. After that I added the catalyst and some more water and it was just fine. But I almost freaked out first.
    When I started painting (starting with my test panel) I noticed some really bad looking orange peel effect, but I remembered reading that the paint will 'flow out for a long time". I just kept painting part after part with the first cross coat and looking back at the parts I painted first, they did start to "flow out" and the orange peel started to disappear. Definitely something I had to get used too. I will post some pictures of the parts with the primer on tomorrow.

    Here are pictures of the "gel paint" and the set up of the "party tent paint booth".

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    When I got back into the shop this morning the primer looked really great. Attached are pictures of the nose bowl, one wheel pant and left hand side cowling. Today I sprayed the Daytona White top coat. I really love how easy it is to clean up the spray gun. Just rinse it in the sink. My friend also commented his shop doesn't smell much at all and when he watched me painting he noted how little overspray the turbine system creates (last picture). He just finished painting his RV-7A.
    Next will be masking off the stripes and shoot the red paint.

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    Rock On! Looking Good!

  10. #10
    Pacer42Z's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stewart paint using turbine paint system

    Spent the whole Sunday working on my cowling and wheel pants. I was so naïve to believe I would get the stripes done today. Lesson learned, nothing is quick when painting your airplane. The white top coat worked out OK. If you would have paid someone to do it, you would be upset, but I won't lose sleep over it. I have some dirt in it and also some orange peel if you look close. It is not the Stewart Paint and also not because I am using my turbine system. It is because I'm just not a good painter. If I paint more often I'm sure I could get pretty good at it. I will keep going and bit by bit do a full restoration of the Pacer. I'm sure in a couple of years when I have painted the wings and/or fuselage I will look at the cowling and wonder how I ever could have been so bad of a painter.
    Here are some pictures of the Daytona White top coat and masking off the red stripe. I am using a laser level to get the transition from the fuselage to the cowling as straight as possible. Same on the wheel pants to get the tape on straight. I'll be back at it next weekend. Still time to get it done before Sun & Fun.

    Juergen
    Pacer N3342Z
    Attached Images Attached Images

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