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Thread: Not bad

  1. #1

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    Default Not bad

    Got down nice, but sounds like pilot misfueled and ran out



    Last edited by SMO22; 07-28-2020 at 11:57 PM.

  2. #2

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    Default Re: Not bad

    Good he got down safe. From departure point to impact was 150+ nm straight line. A ten knot head wind was reported at the accident location. Pumped 15 gallons (about right to get to where he landed) before departure but it doesn’t say what was in the tanks prior to adding or if adding topped it off. 90 degrees so carb ice unlikely but not impossible.
    "Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement." - Fred Brooks

  3. #3

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    Default Re: Not bad

    Does anyone one know how much fuel comes out in flight when a cap is left off? It’s a pretty impressive sight when the tanks are full but I don’t know how much fuel would come out total.
    "Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement." - Fred Brooks

  4. #4

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    Default Re: Not bad

    Carb heat will clear ice up, but I do know of a person that landed on a street because he did not use it and had engine quit. I have only experiened ice a couple times, and heat cleared it up and continued flight, although I did get a big chunk bulit up and caused the engine to quit for a heartbeat and than go back to running fine.. I went directly to the nearest airport that night.. had to have been ice, it ran perfect after that night.

    He may have had full gas or plenty gas left in tanks, so yes maybe not the reason for the forced landing.. but if he had plenty of gas seems his answer to the police would have been yes there is still gas in the tanks instead of pumped 15 gallons, glad pilot got back on the ground safe.

    I have never left a gas cap off.. curious about how far he would get also if that might have happened

  5. #5
    thebeerdedpilot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not bad

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff J View Post
    Does anyone one know how much fuel comes out in flight when a cap is left off? It’s a pretty impressive sight when the tanks are full but I don’t know how much fuel would come out total.
    Haha, I didn't tighten the fuel cap on a Cherokee once. I was flying with my instructor and my mom was in the back. There wasn't an intercom for my mom to plug into so we couldn't hear her when she was talking. She tapped me on the shoulder and I could tell she was pointing towards something and yelling, but I couldn't understand what it was. So I tapped my instructor on the shoulder and asked him to check with her. I could see her yelling at him and pointing, and then I see him look over, nod and give her a thumbs up. I asked him what she said, he said that she said there were cumulus clouds over there. I thought, my mom doesn't know what a cumulus cloud is. So I looked over and saw fuel spraying out of the wing. I said, nope she said there's fuel coming out of the wing!! He looked over and bursted out laughing. We landed and tightened the cap.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Not bad

    I left a cap off a low wing a few years back. It was due to a lack of communication between myself and my load crew. I noticed the fuel coming out as I broke ground. Lost 5 gallons in the time it took to turn around and land. No pattern, just teardropped it back to the runway. I donít think I got more than 100 feet up and 3/4 of a mile from the strip. Topped it off and went again but I have always wondered how much would actually come out. I would think at some point the vacuum would not overcome the weight of the fuel.

    I donít leave a cap off for any reason now. I donít care if I am just walking to the pump to get the hose or retrieving the dipstick from the cockpit, cap goes back on tight.

    I have experienced carb ice once and that was on a summer afternoon. I was flying a complex aircraft that day and the engine started surging. I assume the prop was trying to compensate for the poor engine performance. Cleared right up with carb heat and didnít repeat.

    Lots of things to speculate on in this case. Have to wait for the NTSB findings unless the pilot or someone who knows the pilot wants to disclose the details.
    "Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement." - Fred Brooks

  7. #7
    Stephen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not bad

    I left a fuel cap off my Pacer after fueling a few years back. Fortunately, I checked my fuel gauges after about 40 minutes flying before making a 30 minute crossing of water. I had lost more than half the fuel. I was able to land, refill my tanks and make a temporary cap with tape and plastic. I now carry an extra fuel cap in my tool bag.
    "You can only tie the record for flying low."

  8. #8
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not bad

    I left my fuel cap off recently, got side track loading my passenger and discovered this when I returned after a 45 minute flight.
    IMG_20180909_143558.jpg

  9. #9
    ysifly2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not bad

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    I left my fuel cap off recently, got side track loading my passenger and discovered this when I returned after a 45 minute flight.
    WOW!
    Clearly that must have been a rather leisurely flight, and no sand bars.
    Must have also forgot to pour the fuel in too? Clearly the gas can had to have been pretty full to stay put. I'm still shocked that it would even if it was full, would not think there that much friction to resist the airflow.

    Bryan

  10. #10
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not bad

    Has a vinyl hose with a plastic pipe nipple on it. Most all of the fuel in the jug went in before I departed due to gravity but we didn't land anywhere. He is a big guy and the winds were wicked.

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