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Thread: Tri Pacer front seat removal

  1. #11
    PeterL's Avatar
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    Thanks, I thought I was approaching the removal right, maybe put some grease to the rails.
    Plus, I'll get my wife to jump in and push from the back, one problem with that is she's a Pilot also and I'd have to go flying after and she'll demand that I sit in the right seat and take orders.

    O'well, could be worse.....

    Peter

  2. #12
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    I have the same problem Peter. ;-)

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    I believe the early Pacers have a safety catch at the front to allow the seat to go all the way forward and then you have to lift it up and out. It helps to get someone to push from the back while you undo the latch and pull. Upolstry often helps to hinder the seat removal as Zac mentioned.
    Yes, mine does have a safety catch. The bugger is getting the seat to move all the way forward as it binds up on the tracks. The idea of having a helper push from the back while you manhandle the seat bottom from the front sounds like the way to go. The upholstery is definitely in the way so you have to be careful not to tear the trim panels, or smear grease all over them, during the process.

  4. #14

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    On my '58 I have had the seats in and out a bunch. The right one comes out simply by holding the adjusting knob up and pulling/pushing forward. The left has the little button, but it is easy to push with your finger if the right seat is out. (I guess the button is missing on the right one). A CAUTION! on mine at least, it is real easy to think you have the seat back in and secured 'till you lean back in it. (Ask me how I know) Double check to be sure the front is caught good on the rails. This can be a real pain if you have thick upholstery. The grease does seem to dry out in the rails sooner than expected. Good Luck.
    Sid

  5. #15
    Administrator Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Good point Sid. We had a Clipper not far from here get torn up because the seat was not latched properly and the pilot and passenger ended up in the back seat on take-off. Luckily only the airplane was hurt and it is flying again.

  6. #16

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    Hi Bob
    I have a 59 tripacer also and here is how I remove my right front seat to service the battery. Lift the seat adjust handle with the right hand, Push the seat forward with the left hand to its stop with the adjust lever held in the up position. Hold the seat forward while putting the right hand between the seats and pressing up on the lock button. If you then bump the seat forward with the left hand the seat will slide to the end of the rails and you can lift it out, rear first then forward to clear the front rails. Note that if you let the seat slip back a little the adjusting knob will have to be pulled up and the seat pressed forward and held forward while pressing the little lock button between the seats. To reinstall the seat, set the rear sliders in their slot all the way forward then set the front of the seat down. Raise the rear sliders(rear of the seat) and push forward a bit till the front sliders engage then push seat back till the rear sliders are in their slots on the frame. Push the seat back until the adjusting latch is engaged. PS it is easy to miss the front sliders when installing the seat so after the seat is in, pull up on the front to check.
    Bob Ramsey N9663D

  7. #17

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    Just a thought on a helper to keep the pin from catching. I think something like a hacksaw or feeler gage blade would fit in the slot to keep the pin from catching and allow 2 hands to manipulate the seat or the freedom to get in the back and push if it's really stubborn.

    I haven't lubed my seat tracks but I was thinking a brushed on lube that dries to a film may give better service than grease in the tracks. At the very least it would be cleaner and not attract dirt.

    Jeff

  8. #18
    Tripod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid Brain View Post
    On my '58 I have had the seats in and out a bunch. The right one comes out simply by holding the adjusting knob up and pulling/pushing forward. The left has the little button, but it is easy to push with your finger if the right seat is out. (I guess the button is missing on the right one). A CAUTION! on mine at least, it is real easy to think you have the seat back in and secured 'till you lean back in it. (Ask me how I know) Double check to be sure the front is caught good on the rails. This can be a real pain if you have thick upholstery. The grease does seem to dry out in the rails sooner than expected. Good Luck.
    Sid
    Same with the one-piece bench seat in my '52 Tripacer. There's a guide rail in the center and it's easy to get the guide on top of the rail. Not a good thing when rotating. Other then that, the one-piece bench seat is easy to remove and replace once you get the hang of it. I just have to be careful not to punch holes in the fabric when moving it around into the guides and rails.

  9. #19
    Bob M's Avatar
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    Thanks Bram that was a good instuctional video...I could see it while you "spoke" good job
    Bob

  10. #20

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    Hey seat removers. Just a little tid-bit, to lube the rails / grooves on any airplane (except those airline style rails). Don't use grease! That junk attracts dust, dirt ...etc. making the seats stick. I recommend parafin wax or bar soap. For rails just wipe the bar over the rail. For grooves you might need to peel some flakes into the palm of your hand with a knife or piece of metal with an edge, then smear them into the groove with your fingers. You can kinda feel the soap "melting" into the metal. Be sure to treat all contacting surfaces, top, bottom, and sides.

    This treatment lasts much longer than grease, doesn't stain carpet, and smells good to boot. It's an "old timer" trick this young buck learned years ago.

    skydogk

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